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Chronic alcoholism and vitamin A levels

By on September 2, 2015

Research assesses alcohol’s effect on vitamin A levels in the liver and vitamin A role in the alcoholic liver disease

 
New study report from Columbia University Medical Center in New York researchers explains that alcohol consumption and vitamin A levels in the body are linked. Long term alcohol consumption lowers vitamin A levels in the liver, while raising its levels in other tissues.

The team used 2 groups of mice for multiple experiments, one group receiving alcohol-containing food and the other one alcohol-free food. When researchers measured vitamin A levels, the alcohol-fed mice were found to have lower liver levels and higher other tissue levels of vitamin A.

The findings suggest that excessive alcohol consumption lowers vitamin A levels in the liver. The study found important information about the development of alcoholic liver disease that could lead researchers to new hints about how our body manages its vitamin deposits.

“We hope this study will lead to a broader understanding and appreciation of the fact that excessive consumption of alcohol has a negative effect on vitamin A function in the bod. Ultimately, we hope that vitamin A will be seen as a broad target for alcohol in multiple tissues of the body and that our understanding of alcohol-induced disease will be linked together by its effects on vitamin A”, said Dr. Robin D. Clugston, one of the researchers involved in the study.
By assessing alcohol’s effect on vitamin A levels in the liver and vitamin A role in the alcoholic liver disease, scientists could further investigate vitamin A role in the human body. Also, they would be able to discover how exactly alcohol related diseases are linked to vitamin levels in different organs and tissues, for a better understanding and management of various illnesses.

 
Source: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/09/150901140159.htm

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About Laura Parvan

Medical professional, blogging passionate, with a high interest in social media impact on health-care information.

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